Seeking Executive Director

Application Deadline: June 12, 2018

The Centre for Equality Rights in Accommodation (CERA) is hiring an Executive Director to lead the organization. We are looking for an experienced leader who is passionate about working to address discrimination in housing.

CERA was founded in 1987 as a province-wide, not-for-profit organization dedicated to promoting human rights in housing. Our work is founded on a belief in the inherent dignity and worth of all people. It is in this spirit that we carry out all of our initiatives, which share the common goal of intervening in cycles of discrimination that disproportionately affect low-income and marginalized individuals in the housing market. Through public education, advocacy and law reform CERA works to address barriers preventing individuals from accessing and maintaining housing. We are a leader in our field, using human rights law to address homelessness and poverty.

JOB DESCRIPTION

The Executive Director’s responsibilities include:

Operations Management

  • Oversee planning, implementation and delivery of all of the organization’s projects and services
  • Oversee the day-to-day operations of the organization
  • Work with the Board of Directors in the fulfillment of the strategic plan Key Goals
  • Maintain a work and service environment free from harassment and discrimination
  • Provide oversight for the Human Rights & Housing Tenant Hotline, which provides free legal information and tenant advocacy

Financial Management

  • Oversee the financial health of the organization
  • Prepare budgets and regular financial reports for the Board of Directors
  • Administer the funds of the organization according to the approved budget

Board Engagement

  • Communicate regularly with the Board of Directors about the operation of the organization and prepare reports for monthly Board Meetings
  • Serve as an advisor to the Board of Directors on all aspects of the organization’s activities including the direction of the organization, its programs and services and the financial health of the organization

Human Resources

  • Supervise and train staff, students and volunteers
  • Respond to employee and personnel matters

Policy Reform & Community Development

  • Lead policy reform efforts to improve housing regulation and policy, including participation in international, federal, provincial, and municipal processes
  • Engage in outreach and build community partnerships
  • Strengthen the organization’s presence in the community

Fundraising

  • Oversee and engage in fund development strategies to raise revenue for the organization
  • Complete funding applications to secure ongoing funding for the organization

QUALIFICATIONS 

  • An understanding of human rights law and landlord and tenant law and a thorough knowledge of housing and homelessness issues.
  • A passion for strategic management and demonstrated experience in leadership role(s)
  • Experience developing and implementing innovative funding strategies, managing projects, and forging and maintaining strong relationships with funding and partner organizations.
  • Expertise in organizational management and budget oversight
  • Experience successfully managing staff, academic interns and volunteers.
  • Experience with direct client services and interacting with the public.
  • Excellent writing and communication skills across platforms.
  • Expertise balancing multiple priorities and harnessing the talents of a small group of dedicated and diverse staff, students and volunteers.
  • Ability to maintain an open, positive, respectful and exciting work environment where staff, students and volunteers are supported and valued.
  • A demonstrated interest in working towards ending discrimination and housing insecurity and belief that it is important to help people facing these issues.
  • Experience working with a volunteer Board of Directors is an asset.
  • Being a lawyer or paralegal in good standing would be considered an asset.

Terms of position:

This is a permanent full-time position that offers a generous benefits package. The salary range for this position is from $65,000 to $70,000, and includes group benefits. Flexible work arrangements are possible.

To apply:

All applicants are asked to submit the following:

  1. A cover letter; and
  2. An up-to-date curriculum vitae;

Please submit your application to:

Katie Plaizier, Interim Executive Director

Centre for Equality Rights in Accommodation

164 – 215 Spadina Avenue Toronto, ON M5T 2C7

Email: katie@equalityrights.org

Application submitted via email must be sent as a single PDF document with the subject line “Application for Executive Director”.

We thank all applicant for their interest, however, only applicants selected for an interview will be contacted.

CERA is committed to reflecting the diverse communities we serve, and welcomes applications from individuals who self-identify on the basis of any of the protected grounds under the Human Rights Code. We are committed to full compliance with the Human Rights Code, the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, and all other applicable legislation. We will provide accommodation during the hiring process upon request. Information received relating to accommodation measures will be addressed confidentially.

CALL FOR CERA’s BOARD OF DIRECTORS

CERA is currently seeking two board member swilling to contribute their expertise to our dynamic team. If you know are someone with an interest in human rights and housing, with a background and experience in fundraising or accounting/finance, we would like to hear from you.

We are seeking individuals who share our commitment to protecting human rights, equality rights and social and economic rights, including the right to adequate housing, and who are able to actively participate in regular board meetings.

CERA is interested in broadening the diversity of our Board of Directors and are excited to receive applications from individuals from equity seeking groups.

Successful candidates will:

  • Serve a two-year term from 2018 to 2020;
  • Attend monthly board meetings on the 3rd Tuesday of every month;
  • Participate on board committees as needed;
  • Have a passion for our Mission and Vision; and
  • Have an understanding or lived experience of the communities that we serve.

To apply to the CERA Board of Directors, please email a brief statement of interest along with your resume to Assefa Janko at assefa@equalityrights.org

Application Deadline: April 30, 2018

Thank you for your interest and support of our work!

The Centre for Equality Rights in Accommodation (CERA) is a not-for-profit charitable organization dedicated to preventing evictions and ending housing discrimination across Ontario. CERA was founded in 1987 as the only organization in Canada with a primary focus on promoting human rights in housing. 30 years later, we continue to carry out our mandate through direct tenant support, public education, research, law reform, casework, test case litigation and using international human rights law and mechanisms.

Our Vision

CERA envisions an Ontario where every person realizes their housing rights, is treated with dignity, and lives free from discrimination in a stable, safe and affordable home.

Our Mission

CERA advances the right to housing without discrimination. We do this by:

  1. Educating individuals and communities on the intersection between human rights and housing law;
  2. Engaging in advocacy and supporting individuals in realizing their human rights in housing; and
  3. Promoting inclusive housing law and policy.

 

Seeking youth artist/arts facilitator for paid opportunity!

Call for Youth Peer Artist/Arts Facilitator

The Centre for Equality Rights in Accommodation (CERA) is working with five youth-serving groups across Ontario to build awareness about youth housing rights. We are seeking an artist or arts facilitator to co-develop a creative workshop and educational materials for this exciting initiative.

Are you:

  • a visual artist or arts facilitator who is interested in working with small charities on important social issues?
  • familiar with the barriers and challenges to housing that young people face?
  • able to design in collaboration with CERA’s team a 2-2.5 hour session in which 10-15 participants use visual arts to creatively express their housing experiences?
  • able to co-design educational materials for a range of audiences?
  • available to work with us between January and April, 2018?

How to apply:

Our funding includes an honorarium of $2000 for this role, which we are happy to discuss in more detail.

Please contact me if you are interested in working with us! We will be accepting applications until January 10, 2018. Please include a statement of interest and resume or link to your work. Priority will be given to someone who has experiences of housing discrimination and/or homelessness.

Contact:       assefa@equalityrights.org or 416-944-0087 ext.3

About CERA:

CERA envisions an Ontario where every person realizes their housing rights, is treated with dignity, and lives free from discrimination in a stable, safe and affordable home.

CERA defends housing rights and human rights by educating individuals and communities, advancing progressive and inclusive housing law and policy, and providing legal information and services to marginalized Ontarians.

Read more about our Youth Housing Rights Program on our website: www.equailtyrights.org/cera

Bruce Porter Reflects on CERA’s 30th Anniversary

“CERA was formed in the heyday of the equality rights movement in Canada. That’s why it has it that cumbersome name that no one can remember or say. In the 1980s in Canada, “equality rights” were in the air. Equality seeking groups began the decade by fighting for and winning a radical reframing of non-discrimination rights in the new Canadian Charter to have them renamed as “equality rights.” Section 15 of the Charter was reworded to ensure not only that laws and policies should not discriminate, but also that they would provide “equal benefit” to disadvantaged groups. People with disabilities were recognized for the first time. Following on that victory at the national level, hearings were held in 1986 at the Ontario Legislature, into a proposed “Equality Rights Statute Law Amendment Act”, intended to ensure that the Human Rights Code and other provincial legislation conformed with the new understanding of equality in s.15 of the Charter. Of course, the government had left a lot out of its draft bill. That’s when we formed the Committee for Equal Access to Apartments – the precursor of CERA, and got to work. Along with a lot of others…

Those hearings were incredibly energizing and demonstrated a new sense of collaboration and shared purpose among equality seeking groups.  The Committee for Equal Access to Apartments mobilized low income tenants from across the province  working to advocate for two amendments to the Human Rights Code to address prominent systemic issues in housing at that time.  One was to remove an exemption that allowed landlords to designate their buildings as “adult only” and exclude families with children.  This had become a convenient way for landlords to “gentrify” their apartments while low income renting families were simply left out the tight rental market.  The other was to extend protections from age discrimination in housing to include 16 and 17 year olds in need of housing.  We won on both counts, but only after an unprecedented number of compelling submissions at Queen’s Park from low income parents, mostly women, and young people describing the effects of discrimination in housing.

Our own discrete victories, however, were part of a wave of victories in which all the different equality seeking groups collaborated. Sexual orientation was added as a prohibited ground of discrimination; protections for people with disabilities were strengthened and adverse effect discrimination was more expansively addressed.  During all of the collaborative work,  marginalized groups in housing, particularly those living in poverty, became part of the human rights movement in a new way.  It became obvious that we needed an organization to continue to promote human rights in hosing and to make hard won protections work for groups that are too often ignored.   We knew it was a daunting task, but I don’t think any of imagined that CERA would still be around three decades later.

CERA’s ideals are perhaps further from being realized now than they ever have been.  However, it is hard to imagine where we would be without CERA’s work over the last 30 years.  CERA has been a voice for the people who don’t usually get heard.   It has changed the way we think about equality in housing, raised awareness of the right to adequate housing and changed the way the international human rights system works.  It has achieved precedent setting recognition of income related discrimination, addressed eviction prevention in new and innovative ways and changed the way we think about equality and human rights in housing.  CERA changed me and so many others over the years and through all of us, informed what has been done in many other places around the world.  It has been an incubator for a more inclusive human rights movement in Canada and internationally.

For CERA to have survived for thirty years without any stable operational funding, surviving through hostile governments and times of austerity measures, is an historic accomplishment, not only for the institution, but also for the ideals for which CERA stands.   It has survived because of the dedication and commitment of staff, board, volunteers and members to a vision that has only become more relevant, more necessary,  more compelling over the course of those years.

When we opened CERA’s phone line 30 years ago, the thing we would hear from people more often than anything else was this:  “You’re the first organization that has really listened to me and taken my concerns seriously.”  CERA still does that.  The acronym of a little organization, with a cumbersome name has come to resonate for a lot of people who have felt they were heard for the first time and for a lot of human rights advocates and human rights institutions who have learned from CERA how to hear human rights claims in a new way.

“CERA”.  It has become a word in its own right, with the historic reference to the equality rights wave of 30 years ago still resonating in its identity.

CERA.   30 years old.  Imagine!  It makes me feel quite proud of all of us!!”

Bruce Porter co-founded CERA in 1987, and is currently the Executive Director of the Social Rights Advocacy Centre.

Community Art Show Raises Awareness of Discrimination Against Sex Workers

On April 7th, over 30 community members joined CERA and mural artists at All Saints Church and Community Centre to view murals created by sex workers at recent housing rights workshops in downtown Toronto. Attendees took part in discussions about housing discrimination issues, received information resources about housing discrimination, and shared a community lunch. We heard:

Making the murals “allowed me and participants to illustrate what a city of inclusion means to them.”

“Knowing your rights in empowering. “

“I will share resources with people in my community.”

Thank you to everyone who attended, to all of the mural makers, to South Riverdale Community Health Centre, Regent Park Community Health Centre, and Maggie’s Sex Workers Action Project. And a big thank you to All Saints Church for hosting us.


Out of respect for the privacy of the mural makers, we are not posting event photos online.

Thank you to the Law Foundation of Ontario for financial support of this initiative.

 

CERA releases findings from Seniors’ Eviction Prevention Initiative

Between October 2016 and February 2017, CERA gathered input from and held roundtable conversations and a community forum with senior tenants, front-line workers, and other stakeholders across the GTA.

Read our report and recommendations. We hope that our findings will lead to community-led strategies and system-wide improvements that meet the needs of vulnerable senior tenants in the GTA.

Want a hard copy mailed to you or to someone who needs to read this? Email cera@equalityrights.org or call 416-944-0087 to provide your mailing address and request a copy.

 

CERA is grateful for financial support from the Ontario Trillium Foundation, an agency of the government of Ontario.

Know Your Housing Rights Sessions for Sex Workers


Project Update – Thank you to Maggie’s, South Riverdale Community Health Centre and Regent Park Community Health Centre for hosting CERA’s housing rights sessions for sex workers over the past six weeks. Special thank you to all the participants for sharing their housing experiences and learning about their legal rights as tenant.

Whenever possible, CERA uses creative models of legal education to engage with communities in meaningful ways. 100% of participants said the sessions gave them a better understanding of their rights in housing. 74% said the information they learned will significantly benefit their lives.

The collaborative sessions combined legal education about housing rights with mural making, led by community artist Catherine Moeller.

What we heard from participants about the mural making:

  • “Great alternative way to express what I have learned.”
  • “It brought people together and it helped express feeling through art.”
  • “Provided a means of expression for those who are less verbal.”
  • “Yes it allowed me and participants to illustrate what a city of inclusion means to them.”

You’ll be able to check out the murals on display the last week of March, location to be announced shortly!

Thank you to the Law Foundation of Ontario.

 

PROJECT UPDATE! Facilitating Local Responses to Housing Discrimination

After two exciting years of work, we are bringing our Facilitating Local Responses to Housing Discrimination Project to a close. We are very pleased with the success of this initiative and are exited to share the new resources developed with our partners with you. For this initiative, we collaborated with partner organizations in Ottawa, Hamilton, Sudbury, Thunder Bay, London, Windsor and Toronto. Recognizing that local housing priorities are diverse, our work focused on the specific local needs identified by the communities we worked in, including: challenges faced by urban Inuit, Metis and First Nations renters in Ottawa; discrimination against Aboriginal youth in Thunder Bay; discrimination directed at newcomers in Hamilton; failure to accommodate tenants with mental health disabilities in Sudbury; the housing needs of aging residents in London; discriminatory practices affecting lower-income renters in Windsor; and discriminatory barriers facing women in Toronto.

While discriminatory barriers exist in all housing markets, we know that the specific issues that are acute and emerging differ in communities across the province. Through our project work, we have begun to foster local capacity to address housing instability through community work and knowledge sharing with precariously housed tenants and their housing advocates. Specifically, we have been able to:

• Foster partnerships in seven communities, including six communities outside of Toronto;

• Develop and distribute thousands of resources that are responsive to housing related challenges that are community specific benefiting tenants, service providers, and housing providers who need this information;

• Deliver 26 in person public legal education sessions throughout the province;

• Develop and support Human Rights and Housing Ambassadors in communities across the province; and

• Follow through on conversations and ideas that stretch back to 2012, advancing progress on key issues identified in each community.

After many hours of writing and lots of conversations with our wonderful partners across the province, we developed a large number of new resources for tenants, service providers and housing providers across Ontario. Here they are! Please share them with your family, neighbours, and communities to help fight against housing discrimination.

RESOURCES 

Fact Sheets

Fact Sheet Hamilton

Fact Sheet London

Fact Sheet Ottawa

Fact Sheet Sudbury

Fact Sheet ThunderBay

 Fact Sheet Toronto

 Fact Sheet Windsor

Myth Cards

Myth Cards Hamilton 1

Myth Cards Hamilton 2

Myth Cards London 1

Myth Cards London 2

Myth Cards London 3

Myth Cards Ottawa 1

Myth Cards Ottawa 2

Myth Cards Sudbury 1

Myth Cards Sudbury 2

Myth Cards Thunder Bay 1

Myth Cards Thunder Bay 2

Myth Cards Toronto 1

Myth Cards Toronto 2

Myth Cards Windsor 1

Myth Cards Windsor 2

Self Advocacy Toolkit 

Self Advocacy Toolkit English

Self Advocacy Toolkit French

Self Advocacy Toolkit Inuktitut

 Self Advocacy Toolkit Spanish

Self Advocacy Toolkit Arabic

Tips for Tenants 

Tips for Aging Tenants, London

Tips for Indigenous Tenants, Ottawa

Tips for Indigenous Youth, Thunder Bay

Tips for Newcomers, Hamilton

 Tips for Tenants, Windsor

Tips for Women, Toronto

Tips for Tenants with Mental Health Disabilities and Addictions, Sudbury

We want to sincerely thank all of the partners who helped to make this work a success including: Age Friendly London Network, CMHA Sudbury Manitoulin, Hamilton Community Legal Clinic, Housing Help Hamilton, Kinna-aweya Legal Clinic, Odawa Native Friendship Centre’s Drop In, Sistering, Voices Against Poverty and numerous shelters, drop-ins and community organizations in Toronto.

We also wish to thank the Ontario Trillium Foundation, an agency of the Government of Ontario, for their support of this initiative.


 www.otf.ca

While we are bringing this project to an end, we are looking forward to new opportunities to continue this exciting work in these communities throughout 2017!

CERA Will Reignite Work on Women’s Rights

We are excited to announce that in 2017, with the support of Status of Women Canada, CERA will reignite our work on women’s rights by partnering with IRIS and Riverdale Immigrant Women’s Center and a number of other women serving agencies in Toronto.

This project will address systemic barriers that contribute to housing insecurity in Toronto through the development of an action plan that addresses barriers to safe, affordable housing and increases access to housing options for marginalized women across the city.

This project has been funded by Status of Women Canada.